World Indigenous Day Celebrations 2012

After a long hiatus from working with my friends from the Indigenous Peoples Network of Malaysia (JOAS), meeting them during the World Indigenous Day Celebrations felt like a big family reunion.

I would be lying if I said I did not have my ups and down working with the network. Like with anything you feel strongly about, there are bound to be times of despair and frustration. But all that accumulated tears and sweat just makes the good times even better and the little achievements even more celebrated.

The little achievement during this event for me would be working with the media team to document and update the Center for Orang Asli Concern (COAC)’s Facebook page with same day/ next day photo and video updates. Although I went to Miri without a designated team, everything just sort of went into place organically and an impromptu team worked together to get the job done while having a great time.

It means even more to me because the capacity of the team to do it I feel has much to do with the community-based documentary training done between 2009-2010 to produce Towards Sustainable Forestry (Ke Arah Hutan Lestari). Apart from learning a whole lot from the project myself as one of the facilitators, quite a number of indigenous youth videographers were trained up and continue to document every World Indigenous Day Celebrations since then. It is so fulfilling now to see the continuity from the project applied.

This year, for the first time ever, we uploaded live updates of photos, videos and articles on the Center for Orang Asli Concern (COAC)’s Facebook page.

Here are some highlights from the annual celebrations:

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The event was held at Balai Raya Taman Tunku, Miri (Sarawak) after being rejected from 3 other venues. Here’s Pakcik Arom from Kelantan leading the Peninsular Malaysia group in an Orang Asli sewang performance.

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The opening day was officiated with an Iban Miring ceremony.

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The “Bebiau” ceremony.

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The chicken sacrifice.

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Traditional sports competition such as blowpipe, opening a coconut and tug of war with rattan instead of rope, as always, gathers the most excitement and noise from the crowd.

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Photography competition

It’s my second year with the honor of being one of the judges for it, and I must say, I’m blown away by the improvement in submissions. It was a really tough call this year and in the end Sharis bin Shafie won it, followed by Serengeh anak Useh, Freddy James Tonius and Henry John taking second, third and fourth place respectively.

And of course, each night we were spoilt silly with beautiful dance performances from all 3 regions, Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak with the participants dressed in their respective traditional costume.

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Buah Sumbeh used as face paint.

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Ayon (left) and Rokiah in traditional Orang Asli costumes.

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The Sarawak group preparing for their performance in the tent outside.

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Preparing to put on the “Sugu Tinggi”

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Marker pen tattoo. Why not.

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Traditional drinks (rice wine of course) served at night while participants watch traditional performances and listen to community leaders share their plight and successes.

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Dancing together

On a more random note, I’m not often in Sarawak so it took awhile for me to adjust to working around all the feathered headgear and avoiding getting my eye poked out by them.

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Check out the full updates; photos, videos and articles/ news updates on Center for Orang Asli Concern’s Facebook page here.

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The media team! (from right): Jenita, myself, Yein, Kar Lye, Serengeh, Didi, Kato, Gabe, Leonard, Irene, Nasiri and Dumay. Not in photo: Ros, Shirley, Patrick, Jef and Jubi (Photo taken by Edwin Meru).

River play

Children bathing in the river while the intestine of a cow, sacrificed for a feast that evening, is being washed downstream next to them. (Puah Sze Ning)

I daresay I’ve probably missed a number of opportune moments to take river shots. We go to the river to bathe in the evenings and I normally leave my camera behind out of sheer exhaustion from travelling, fear that I might slip and dunk my camera into the water and other thoughts such as making sure my sarong does not come loose and float away (we bathe in the open with a sarong wrapped tightly around).

Here are some photos from times when I brought my camera with me.

The top photo was taken during our filming of Drowned Forest and Damned Lives, a campaign documentary against the construction of the Kelau dam which would relocate two Orang Asli (indigenous minorities) communities without their free prior and informed consent. We took a bath in the Kelau river and just as we were done, some Felda settlers came fresh from slaughtering a cow and were washing parts of the cow (like the intestine in the man’s hands) in the river.

Below are some photos from Sabah and Peninsular Malaysia.

Chewong child jumping into Sg Rengit for a swim | 2007 (Puah Sze Ning/Puah Sze Ning | szening.com..)

Chewong girl from Kuala Gandah leaping into the river. (http://szening.com)

Chewong child jumping into Sg Rengit for a swim | 2007 (Puah Sze Ning/Puah Sze Ning | szening.com..)

Chewong kids from Kuala Gandah having run in the river. (http://szening.com)

These shots of the river are from Kg Mengkawago. It’s a rural village where the villagers are dependent on the rain and river for water. Unfortunately illegal logging upstream has polluted their river, jeopardizing their water source, worst felt during the drought.

The women here in Kg Mengkawago depend on the river to bath, wash their clothes as well as their cooking wares. (http://szening.com)

Children in Kg Mengkawago bathing in the murky river, polluted by illegal logging upstream. As a result, many of them suffer from skin ailments. (http://szening.com)